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Simulation Video Games

OpenTTD, part three: Vehicles

I have been away from this site yet again, but this time I’ve been working a lot and also working on a personal project which I hope will be awesome! I’ll get around to posting about that soon, but for now, you know what I forgot to include in both OpenTTD, part one: A history and the basics and OpenTTD, part two: Economy and game mechanics? Details on the various vehicles that are available in the game! If the roads and tracks are the veins of the transportation system, then the vehicles are the blood, and I am insane for not having gone into this sooner. So here it is! An unexpected part three to the OpenTTD mini-series. I will be going into detail with trains a little more than the others, but either way, prepare for some serious study involving comparisons of speed, weight, power, and tractive effort!

Calculating vehicle speeds

Let’s start by diving into vehicle speeds, shall we? Now, to figure out the speed of the vehicles in OpenTTD, we should first start with some definitions. Internally, OpenTTD works with a unit called km-ish/h and the conversion factor from km-ish/h to km/h is 1.00584, whilst the conversion factor from km-ish/h to mph is 1.6. Also, a tile is, for vehicle speed purposes, 664.(216) km-ish, 668 km or 415 miles long. This is based on the following data gathered by those at the OpenTTD Wiki.

  • A tile has 16 sub-locations per x/y axis.
  • A vehicle has stores remainder of tile movement in a byte called sub-speed, thus has 256 different values.
  • The vehicle’s raw speed is added to sub-speed. The resulting number is divided by 256, the remainder is stored in sub-speed, and the vehicle is moved quotient sub-locations forward. For trains and aircraft, the raw speed is in km-ish/h, for road vehicles and ships, it is in 0.5 km-ish/h. For trains and aircraft, this step is done twice per tick, whereas ships and road vehicles do it once per tick.
  • A day contains 74 ticks, and takes 24 hours.

Are you still with me? Ok, cool. So, now let’s assume a vehicle going 1 km-ish/hour.

(1 × 16 × 256) / (74 × 2) × 24 = 664.(216)

The net result is that 100 km/h is ~3.6 tiles/day.

Road Vehicles

OpenTTD: Balogh Goods Truck

Road vehicles accelerate at 37 km-ish/h/day and can go around corners at half their max speed. They will accelerate an additional 74 km-ish/h per day downhill, but when going uphill, road vehicles slow down 10% four times per tile. This balances out with acceleration at 34-ish km/h for all road vehicles. However, this does not apply when using the improved road vehicle acceleration model.

Ships

OpenTTD: Cs-Inc. Oil Tanker

Ships will accelerate at 37 km-ish/h per day and a “stopped” ship will resume its last speed instantly… Um, yeah, it’s a little bit like magic.

Aircraft

OpenTTD: Airbus A330

In regards to aircraft, by default they fly at a quarter of their listed speed, but this can be changed in the advanced settings. Aircraft acceleration varies per aircraft, between 144 km-ish/h per day and 400 km-ish/h per day. However, broken down planes fly at 320 km-ish/h, and the airport taxi speed is 150 km-ish/h.

Trains

OpenTTD: Ginzu A4

Here we will be dealing with an optional method of train acceleration – realistic train acceleration, a patch that can be activated in the advanced settings like shown below. The realistic acceleration for trains setting turns on a simple physics-based acceleration model. Having this patch activated means that depending on the weight of the train, the power of the engine, and the gradient of the slope that the train is going up or down, the acceleration will be changed in a slightly more realistic manner than the default methods.

OpenTTD: Realistic train acceleration

For building railway tracks, this has a number consequences which, in my opinion, make it a much more interesting experience. Firstly, train acceleration and maximum speed are affected by engine power, maximum tractive effort, i.e. all engines and powered wagons combined, current speed, air drag, total train mass, and wagons/engines on slopes. Additionally, tilting trains gain an additional bonus of 20% on the maximum speed, but small slopes don’t affect the speed by much and trains are not affected going up or down hills if they are powerful enough. Moreover, a heavy train with a weak engine might not reach the engine’s maximum speed because of all the friction but having multi-engine trains help in this regard. Also, depots and stations have speed limits, limiting trains to entering and exiting a depot at 61km/h, and speed limits are multiplied by a factor of 1.5 for monorails and 2 for maglevs.

When it comes to taking corners, really sharp corners are punished a lot as 90° curves have a speed limit of 61 km/h, whilst two successive 45° curves in the same direction get limited to 88 km/h. For softer curves, the speed limit is calculated from the number of direction changes along the length of the train, among others. In the tables below, curvature simply means the average number of wagons of the train between turns, although, very sharp turns such as curvatures 0 and 1 are not averaged out in longer trains. This can be used to determine the maximum speed in either kilometres or miles that a train may take around such a curve, like the two examples we looked at moments ago.

Curvature Max speed (km/h) Max speed (mi/h)
Railroad Monorail Maglev Railroad Monorail Maglev
0 (90° turn) 61 91 121 37 56 75
1 (2×45° turn) 88 132 176 54 82 109
2 111 166 221 68 103 137
3 132 198 264 82 123 164
4 151 226 301 93 140 187
5 168 252 336 104 156 208
6 183 274 365 113 170 226
7 196 294 392 121 182 243
8 207 310 413 128 192 256
9 216 324 432 134 201 268
10 223 334 445 138 207 276
11 228 342 456 141 212 283
12+ 231 346 461 143 214 286

And that’s it in regards to vehicle speeds. There isn’t a need to worry about these too much since at the end of the day, all it means is that sending trains up steep hills and around impossible corners will slow them down, just like they realistically should. Although, in the case of the 90° curve, it is possible to turn off the trains ability to take this degree of curve in the advanced settings, like shown below, to make it more realistic, which I would highly recommend.

OpenTTD: 90° turns

There’s also an option in there which allows us to prevent trains from magically flipping around to go back in the same direction within a station, like shown below, which would be physically impossible given the circumstances. This would mean that the traditional terminus stations no longer work, but adds another interesting element for us to deal with when designing tracks.

OpenTTD: Reversing at stations

Vehicle accidents

Vehicles can have accidents, except for ships, and here is how this may happen for each vehicle type.

Road vehicles

Road vehicles can’t get into accidents with each other, but they can be destroyed in collisions with trains, although the train will continue on after such a collision as though nothing had happened. Now, despite the fact that the lights on a railway crossing flash and stop any approaching road vehicles when a train is coming, if a vehicle is already on the crossing, either because it is slow or broken down, and the train is moving quickly, the road vehicle might not be able to leave the crossing in time and will be… obliterated. However, remember path signals from OpenTTD, part one: A history and the basics? They can be used to close the crossing earlier and thereby reduce the chance of collision. Also, if a double track railway is in use, make sure there is enough room for the road vehicles to wait between the tracks. Alternatively, a bridge or tunnel can be used to cross roads and railway tracks instead, making road vehicle collisions with trains a non-issue.

Aircraft

Aircraft will sometimes crash when they land at an airport which will block the runway for a while and lower the station rating at the airport considerably. We remember station ratings from OpenTTD, part two: Economy and game mechanics, right?

Anyway, the size of the plane is important because planes, by default, have a 0.07% chance to crash* each time that they land at an airport. This chance is increased to 5% if the plane is large and trying to land in a small or commuter airport. However, the amount of random plane crashes can be changed via the advanced settings menu like shown below. The options for this are Normal, Reduced, and None.

OpenTTD: Number of plane crashes

* Accidents involving aircraft aren’t this likely in real life, thankfully. Also, here’s a list of accidents and incidents involving commercial aircraft (Wikipedia) for anyone interested.

Trains

It is possible for trains to crash and this will destroy both trains, render the track impassable for a while, and significantly reduce the station rating at all nearby stations. The solution to this is simple – make use of signals even as simply as we did in OpenTTD, part one: A history and the basics.

Vehicle statistics comparison tables

Here we have tables listing all of the statistics for all of the available vehicles in OpenTTD.

Also, remember from OpenTTD, part two: Economy and game mechanics that inflation exists and may effect costs, so if there are slight differences between the values presented here and what you see in your game, that may be the reason for it.

Some of these tables have quite a bit of information so some horizontal scrolling has been implemented so that the table columns don’t have to be squished or so that the tables don’t have to be split up. There was an alternative option to this which involved JavaScript to expand the table when it is clicked, like often seen on some Wikis, but it’s a bit fiddly on some devices, mainly touch screens such as tablets and smart-phones, so I chose to not go down that route. However, if someone has an idea for a better way to do this, feel free to throw it at me via the contact form.

Lastly, because tables are tables, here is a simple table of contents to help navigate them. There will be a “back to the contents” type link after every table so that getting back here will be easier as well.

Road vehicles

Here are all of the road vehicles available in the game, grouped by cargo type in alphabetical order, and then sorted by the year in which they were designed.

Armoured trucks

All armoured trucks are capable of also carrying gold or diamonds, depending on the climate.

Climate Model name Cost Speed Running cost/year Designed Lifespan Capacity
£ ($) km/h(mph) £/yr ($/yr) year years
Temperate, Sub-Arctic, Sub-Tropical Balogh Armoured Truck 5,945 (11,890) 48 (30) 421 (842) 1936 15 years 12 bags of valuables
Temperate, Sub-Arctic, Sub-Tropical Uhl Armoured Truck 6,970 (13,940) 88 (55) 787 (1,574) 1981 15 years 15 bags of valuables
Temperate, Sub-Arctic, Sub-Tropical Foster Armoured Truck 7,380 (14,760) 112 (70) 1,125 (2,250) 2012 15 years 16 bags of valuables

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Coal trucks

Climate Model name Cost Speed Running cost/year Designed Lifespan Capacity
£ ($) km/h(mph) £/yr ($/yr) year years
Temperate, Sub-Arctic Balogh Coal Truck 4,428 (8,856) 48 (30) 421 (842) 1935 15 years 20 tonnes of coal
Temperate, Sub-Arctic Uhl Coal Truck 5,248 (10,496) 88 (55) 787 (1,574) 1975 15 years 25 tonnes of coal
Temperate, Sub-Arctic DW Coal Truck 5,658 (11,316) 112 (70) 1,125 (2,250) 2013 15 years 28 tonnes of coal

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Copper ore trucks

Climate Model name Cost Speed Running cost/year Designed Lifespan Capacity
£ ($) km/h(mph) £/yr ($/yr) year years
Sub-Tropical MPS Copper Ore Truck 4,961 (9,922) 48 (30) 421 (842) 1935 15 years 22 tonnes of copper ore
Sub-Tropical Uhl Copper Ore Truck 5,740 (11,480) 88 (55) 787 (1,574) 1977 15 years 25 tonnes of copper ore
Sub-Tropical Goss Copper Ore Truck 6,150 (12,300) 112 (70) 1,125 (2,250) 2011 15 years 27 tonnes of copper ore

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Food vans

Climate Model name Cost Speed Running cost/year Designed Lifespan Capacity
£ ($) km/h(mph) £/yr ($/yr) year years
Sub-Arctic, Sub-Tropical Foster Food Van 4,592 (9,184) 48 (30) 421 (842) 1935 15 years 17 tonnes of food
Sub-Arctic, Sub-Tropical Perry Food Van 5,494 (10,988) 88 (55) 787 (1,574) 1971 15 years 20 tonnes of food
Sub-Arctic, Sub-Tropical Chippy Food Van 5,904 (11,808) 112 (70) 1,125 (2,250) 2004 15 years 22 tonnes of food

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Fruit trucks

Climate Model name Cost Speed Running cost/year Designed Lifespan Capacity
£ ($) km/h(mph) £/yr ($/yr) year years
Sub-Tropical Balogh Fruit Truck 4,838 (9,676) 48 (30) 421 (842) 1935 15 years 18 tonnes of fruit
Sub-Tropical Uhl Fruit Truck 6,068 (12,136) 88 (55) 787 (1,574) 1978 15 years 20 tonnes of fruit
Sub-Tropical Kelling Fruit Truck 6,478 (12,956) 112 (70) 1,125 (2,250) 2012 15 years 23 tonnes of fruit

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Goods trucks

Climate Model name Cost Speed Running cost/year Designed Lifespan Capacity
£ ($) km/h(mph) £/yr ($/yr) year years
Temperate, Sub-Arctic, Sub-Tropical Balogh Goods Truck 4,387 (8,774) 48 (30) 421 (842) 1936 15 years 14 crates of goods
Temperate, Sub-Arctic, Sub-Tropical Craighead Goods Truck 5,330 (10,660) 88 (55) 787 (1,574) 1974 15 years 16 crates of goods
Temperate, Sub-Arctic, Sub-Tropical Goss Goods Truck 5,740 (11,480) 112 (70) 1,125 (2,250) 2005 15 years 18 crates of goods

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Grain trucks

Climate Model name Cost Speed Running cost/year Designed Lifespan Capacity
£ ($) km/h(mph) £/yr ($/yr) year years
Temperate, Sub-Arctic, Sub-Tropical Hereford Grain Truck 4,674 (9,348) 48 (30) 421 (842) 1935 15 years 20 tonnes of grain
Temperate, Sub-Arctic, Sub-Tropical Thomas Grain Truck 5,453 (10,906) 88 (55) 787 (1,574) 1979 15 years 25 tonnes of grain
Temperate, Sub-Arctic, Sub-Tropical Goss Grain Truck 5,863 (11,726) 112 (70) 1,125 (2,250) 2010 15 years 30 tonnes of grain

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Iron ore trucks

Climate Model name Cost Speed Running cost/year Designed Lifespan Capacity
£ ($) km/h(mph) £/yr ($/yr) year years
Temperate MPS Iron Ore Truck 4,961 (9,922) 48 (30) 421 (842) 1935 15 years 22 tonnes of iron ore
Temperate Uhl Iron Ore Truck 5,740 (11,480) 88 (55) 787 (1,574) 1977 15 years 25 tonnes of iron ore
Temperate Goss Iron Ore Truck 6,150 (12,300) 112 (70) 1,125 (2,250) 2011 15 years 27 tonnes of iron ore

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Livestock vans

Climate Model name Cost Speed Running cost/year Designed Lifespan Capacity
£ ($) km/h(mph) £/yr ($/yr) year years
Temperate, Sub-Arctic Talbott Livestock Van 4,305 (8,610) 48 (30) 421 (842) 1935 15 years 14 items of livestock
Temperate, Sub-Arctic Uhl Livestock Van 5,330 (10,660) 88 (55) 787 (1,574) 1980 15 years 16 items of livestock
Temperate, Sub-Arctic Foster Livestock Van 5,740 (11,480) 112 (70) 1,125 (2,250) 2022 15 years 18 items of livestock

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Mail trucks

Climate Model name Cost Speed Running cost/year Designed Lifespan Capacity
£ ($) km/h(mph) £/yr ($/yr) year years
Temperate, Sub-Arctic, Sub-Tropical MPS Mail Truck 4,715 (9,430) 48 (30) 421 (842) 1935 15 years 22 bags of mail
Temperate, Sub-Arctic, Sub-Tropical Reynard Mail Truck 5,535 (11,070) 88 (55) 787 (1,574) 1980 15 years 28 bags of mail
Temperate, Sub-Arctic, Sub-Tropical Perry Mail Truck 5,945 (11,890) 112 (70) 1,125 (2,250) 15 years 2018 30 bags of mail
Toyland MightyMover Mail Truck 6,289 (12,578) 48 (30) 562 (1,124) 1935 15 years 22 bags of mail
Toyland Powernaught Mail Truck 7,382 (14,764) 88 (55) 1,050 (2,100) 1980 15 years 28 bags of mail
Toyland Wizzowow Mail Truck 7,929 (15,858) 112 (70) 1,500 (3,000) 2018 15 years 30 bags of mail

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Oil tankers

Climate Model name Cost Speed Running cost/year Designed Lifespan Capacity
£ ($) km/h(mph) £/yr ($/yr) year years
Temperate, Sub-Arctic, Sub-Tropical Witcombe Oil Tanker 4,510 (9,020) 48 (30) 421 (842) 1936 15 years 21,000 litres of oil
Temperate, Sub-Arctic, Sub-Tropical Foster Oil Tanker 5,740 (11,480) 88 (55) 787 (1,574) 1973 15 years 21,000 litres of oil
Temperate, Sub-Arctic, Sub-Tropical Perry Oil Tanker 6,150 (12,300) 112 (70) 1,125 (2,250) 2005 15 years 21,000 litres of oil

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Paper trucks

Climate Model name Cost Speed Running cost/year Designed Lifespan Capacity
£ ($) km/h(mph) £/yr ($/yr) year years
Sub-Arctic Uhl Paper Truck 4,592 (9,184) 48 (30) 421 (842) 1936 15 years 15 tonnes of paper
Sub-Arctic Balogh Paper Truck 5,535 (11,070) 88 (55) 787 (1,574) 1979 15 years 18 tonnes of paper
Sub-Arctic MPS Paper Truck 5,945 (11,890) 112 (70) 1,125 (2,250) 2007 15 years 20 tonnes of paper

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Passenger buses

Climate Model name Cost Speed Running cost/year Designed Lifespan Capacity
£ ($) km/h(mph) £/yr ($/yr) year years
Temperate, Sub-Arctic, Sub-Tropical MPS Regal Bus 4,920 (9,840) 56 (35) 426 (852) 1930 12 years 31 passengers
Temperate, Sub-Arctic, Sub-Tropical Hereford Leopard Bus 5,740 (11,480) 88 (55) 600 (1,200) 1964 15 years 35 passengers
Temperate, Sub-Arctic, Sub-Tropical Foster Bus 6,150 (12,300) 112 (70) 834 (1,668) 1987 15 years 37 passengers
Temperate, Sub-Arctic, Sub-Tropical Foster MkII Bus 6,560 (13,120) 127 (79) 1,125 (2,250) 2008 15 years 40 passengers
Toyland Ploddyphut MkI Bus 4,920 (9,840) 56 (35) 426 (852) 1946 15 years 30 passengers
Toyland Ploddyphut MkII Bus 5,740 (11,480) 96 (60) 801 (1,602) 1972 15 years 35 passengers
Toyland Ploddyphut MkIII Bus 6,560 (13,120) 120 (75) 1,125 (2,250) 2010 15 years 38 passengers

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Rubber trucks

Climate Model name Cost Speed Running cost/year Designed Lifespan Capacity
£ ($) km/h(mph) £/yr ($/yr) year years
Sub-Tropical Balogh Rubber Truck 4,797 (9,594) 48 (30) 421 (842) 1936 15 years 17,000 litres of rubber
Sub-Tropical Uhl Rubber Truck 6,027 (12,054) 88 (55) 787 (1,574) 1977 15 years 19,000 litres of rubber
Sub-Tropical RMT Rubber Truck 6,437 (12,874) 112 (70) 1,125 (2,250) 2011 15 years 22,000 litres of rubber

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Steel trucks

Climate Model name Cost Speed Running cost/year Designed Lifespan Capacity
£ ($) km/h(mph) £/yr ($/yr) year years
Temperate Balogh Steel Truck 4,592 (9,184) 48 (30) 421 (842) 1936 15 years 15 tonnes of steel
Temperate Uhl Steel Truck 5,535 (11,070) 88 (55) 787 (1,574) 1977 15 years 18 tonnes of steel
Temperate Kelling Steel Truck 5,945 (11,890) 112 (70) 1,125 (2,250) 2007 15 years 20 tonnes of steel

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Water tankers

Climate Model name Cost Speed Running cost/year Designed Lifespan Capacity
£ ($) km/h(mph) £/yr ($/yr) year years
Sub-Tropical Uhl Water Tanker 4,551 (9,102) 48 (30) 421 (842) 1936 15 years 21,000 litres of water
Sub-Tropical Balogh Water Tanker 5,781 (11,562) 88 (55) 787 (1,574) 1978 15 years 25,000 litres of water
Sub-Tropical MPS Water Tanker 6,191 (12,382) 112 (70) 1,125 (2,250) 2011 15 years 27,000 litres of water

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Wood trucks

Climate Model name Cost Speed Running cost/year Designed Lifespan Capacity
£ ($) km/h(mph) £/yr ($/yr) year years
Temperate, Sub-Arctic, Sub-Tropical Witcombe Wood Truck 4,838 (9,676) 48 (30) 421 (842) 1935 15 years 20 tonnes of wood
Temperate, Sub-Arctic, Sub-Tropical Foster Wood Truck 5,617 (11,234) 88 (55) 787 (1,574) 1974 15 years 22 tonnes of wood
Temperate, Sub-Arctic, Sub-Tropical Moreland Wood Truck 6,027 (12,054) 112 (70) 1,125 (2,250) 2018 15 years 24 tonnes of wood

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Aircraft

Here are all of the aircraft available grouped by helicopters, small planes, and large planes, and then sorted by the year in which they were designed. These ones actually have separate columns for their carrying capacity of passengers & mail, goods, and valuables, since all vehicles are capable of carrying all four types.

Also, like mentioned earlier, the size of the plane is important because planes, by default, have a 0.07% chance to crash each time that they land at an airport. This chance is increased to 5% if the plane is large and trying to land in a small or commuter airport.

Helicopters

Model name Size Cost Speed Running cost/year Designed Lifespan Capacity
£ ($) km/h (mph) £/yr ($/yr) year years Passengers & Mail Goods Valuables
Tricario Helicopter S 30,761 (61,522) 323 (201) 2,278 (4,556) 1957 20 40 & 15 20 (27) 10 (13)
Guru X2 Helicopter S 34,863 (69,726) 515 (320) 2,165 (4,330) 1997 20 55 & 20 27 (37) 13 (18)

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Small planes

Model name Size Cost Speed Running cost/year Designed Lifespan Capacity
£ ($) km/h (mph) £/yr ($/yr) year years Passengers & Mail Goods Valuables
Sampson U52 S 28,710 (57,420) 476 (296) 2,390 (4,780) 1928 20 25 & 4 14 (NC) 7 (NC)
Bakewell Cotswald S 30,761 (61,522) 476 (296) 2,756 (5,512) 1934 30 30 & 6 18 (NC) 9 (NC)
Coleman Count S 30,761 (61,522) 476 (296) 2,812 (5,624) 1947 24 65 & 8 32 (36) 16 (18)
Bakewell Luckett LB-9 S 34,863 (69,726) 952 (592) 4,218 (8,436) 1964 26 100 & 15 50 (57) 25 (28)
Yate Aerospace YAe46 S 32,812 (65,624) 952 (592) 3,515 (7,030) 1980 25 80 & 10 40 (45) 20 (22)
Dinger 100 S 34,863 (69,726) 952 (592) 4,078 (8,156) 1986 20 85 & 10 42 (47) 21 (23)
Airtaxi A34-1000 S 34,812 (65,624) 952 (592) 3,656 (7,312) 2000 25 75 & 10 37 (42) 18 (21)
Yate Z-Shuttle S 32,812 (65,624) 952 (592) 4,190 (8,380) 2018 22 85 & 10 42 (47) 21 (23)
Kelling K1 S 34,863 (69,726) 952 (592) 4,781 (9,562) 2022 22 65 & 18 32 (41) 16 (20)

Large planes

Model name Size Cost Speed Running cost/year Designed Lifespan Capacity
£ ($) km/h (mph) £/yr ($/yr) year years Passengers & Mail Goods Valuables
FFP Dart L 32,812 (65,624) 952 (592) 3,656 (7,312) 1955 18 90 & 10 45 (50) 25 (NC)
Bakewell Luckett LB-8 L 36,914 (73,828) 952 (592) 6,750 (13,500) 1958 23 200 & 30 100 (115) 50 (57)
Darwin 100 L 36,919 (73,828) 952 (592) 6,750 (13,500) 1962 25 170 & 35 85 (102) 42 (51)
Yate Aerospace YAC 1-11 L 32,812 (65,624) 952 (592) 3,796 (7,592) 1963 22 95 & 10 47 (52) 23 (26)
Darwin 200 L 34,863 (69,726) 952 (592) 4,359 (8,718) 1967 22 110 & 15 55 (62) 27 (31)
Darwin 300 L 61,523 (123,046) 952 (592) 7,115 (14,230) 1967 25 300 & 50 150 (175) 75 (87)
Yate Haugan L 153,808 (307,616) 2,330 (1,448) 7,031 (14,062) 1969 25 100 & 20 50 (60) 25 (30)
Guru Galaxy L 51,269 (102,538) 952 (592) 6,328 (12,656) 1969 20 240 & 35 120 (137) 60 (68)
Bakewell Luckett LB-10 L 38,964 (77,928) 952 (592) 5,400 (10,800) 1971 20 220 & 40 110 (130) 55 (65)
Airtaxi A21 L 41,015 (82,030) 952 (592) 6,609 (13,218) 1973 24 260 & 30 145 (NC) 72 (NC)
Bakewell Luckett LB80 L 36,914 (73,828) 952 (592) 6,890 (13,780) 1978 25 150 & 30 75 (90) 37 (45)
Darwin 500 L 38,964 (77,928) 952 (592) 6,187 (12,374) 1981 25 240 & 25 120 (132) 60 (66)
Darwin 400 L 36,919 (73,828) 952 (592) 5,906 (11,812) 1982 25 200 & 25 100 (112) 50 (56)
Airtaxi A31 L 38,964 (77,928) 952 (592) 6,187 (12,374) 1982 24 210 & 25 105 (117) 52 (58)
Airtaxi A32 L 36,914 (73,828) 952 (592) 4,781 (9,562) 1987 24 160 & 20 80 (90) 40 (45)
Bakewell Luckett LB-11 L 40,515 (81,030) 952 (592) 5,343 (10,686) 1990 25 230 & 25 115 (127) 57 (63)
Darwin 600 L 55,371 (110,742) 952 (592) 6,468 (12,936) 1995 25 260 & 40 130 (150) 65 (75)
Airtaxi A33 L 53,320 (106,640) 952 (592) 5,906 (11,812) 1993 24 220 & 20 110 (120) 55 (60)
Dinger 1000 L 164,062 (328,124) 2,330 (1,448) 7,059 (14,118) 2011 20 130 & 45 65 (87) 32 (43)
Dinger 200 L 44,218 (88,436) 952 (592) 6,875 (13,950) 2013 25 400 & 80 200 (240) 100 (120)
Kelling K6 L 36,914 (73,828) 952 (592) 5,906 (11,812) 2026 22 110 & 25 55 (67) 27 (33)
FFP Hyperdart 2 L 38,964 (77,928) 2,330 (1,448) 4,500 (9,000) 2031 25 85 & 45 42 (65) 21 (32)
Kelling K7 L 41,015 (82,030) 952 (592) 6,468 (12,936) 2036 25 180 & 60 90 (120) 45 (60)
Darwin 700 L 3,066 (86,132) 952 (592) 6,187 (12,374) 2042 23 150 & 65 75 (107) 37 (53)

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Ships

Here are all of the ships available in the game grouped by type of ship – oil tankers, passenger ferries, and cargo ships. Then they are sorted by the year in which they were designed.

Oil Tankers

Model name Cost Speed Running cost/year Designed Lifespan Capacity
£ ($) km/h(mph) £/yr ($/yr) year years
MPS Oil Tanker 30,465 (60,930) 24 (15) 2,296 (4.592) 1928 30 220,000 Litres of Oil
Cs-Inc. Oil Tanker 33,511 (67,022) 40 (25) 2,050 (4.100) 1968 30 350,000 Litres of Oil

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Passenger ferries

Model name Cost Speed Running cost/year Designed Lifespan Capacity
£ ($) km/h(mph) £/yr ($/yr) year years
MPS Passenger Ferry 18,279 (36,558) 32 (20) 1,476 (2.952) 1926 30 100 Passengers
Chugger-Chug Passenger Ferry 18,279 (36,558) 32 (20) 1,476 (2,952) 1946 30 100 Passengers
Bakewell 300 Hovercraft 28,180 (56,360) 112 (70) 3,117 (6,234) 1968 25 100 Passengers
FFP Passenger Ferry 21,325 (42,650) 64 (40) 1,312 (2.624) 1971 30 130 Passengers
Shivershake Passenger Ferry 21,325 (42,650) 64 (40) 1,312 (2,624) 1977 30 130 Passengers

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Cargo ships

Model name Cost Speed Running cost/year Designed Lifespan Capacity
£ ($) km/h(mph) £/yr ($/yr) year years
Yate Cargo Ship 24,372 (48,744) 24 (15) 2,460 (4.920) 1928 30 160 units*
MightyMover Cargo Ship 24,375 (48,750) 24 (15) 2,460 (4,920) 1946 30 160 units of sweets
Bakewell Cargo Ship 27,418 (54,836) 40 (25) 1,853 (3.706) 1974 30 190 units*
Powernaught Cargo Ship 27,421 (54,842) 40 (25) 1,853 (3,706) 1982 30 190 units of sweets
* Units of Mail, Coal, Livestock, Goods, Grain, Wood, Iron ore, Steel, Valuables.

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Train engines

Here are all of the train engines available in the game grouped by engine type in the order that they appear – steam, diesel, electric, monorail, then maglev. Then they are sorted firstly by climate – Temperate, Sub-Arctic and Sub-Tropical, then Toyland; and secondly by the year in which they were designed.

Trains are, in my opinion, the most interesting form of transport in OpenTTD.

Steam engines

Climate Model name Cost Speed Weight Power MTE Running cost/year Designed Lifespan Capacity
£ ($) km/h (mph) t hp (kW) kN £/yr ($/yr) year years
Temperate Kirby Paul Tank 8,203 (16,406) 64 (40) 47 300 (224) 139 820 (1,640) 1925 15 N/A
Temperate Chaney “Jubilee” 15,234 (30,468) 112 (70) 131 1,000 (746) 388 1,968 (3,936) 1934 21 N/A
Temperate Ginzu “A4” 22,265 (44,530) 128 (80) 162 1,200 (895) 480 2,296 (4,592) 1935 20 N/A
Temperate SH “8P” 25,781 (51,562) 144 (90) 170 1,600 (1,193) 504 2,132 (4,264) 1954 23 N/A
Sub-Arctic, Sub-Tropical Wills 2-8-0 16,406 (32,812) 88 (55) 145 1,100 (820) 430 2,132 (4,264) 1945 21 N/A
Toyland Ploddyphut Choo-Choo 11,718 (23,514) 72 (45) 85 400 (298) 252 1,476 (2,952) 1946 20 N/A
Toyland Powernaut Choo-Choo 17,578 (35,270) 96 (60) 130 900 (671) 385 2,132 (4,264) 1952 20 N/A
Toyland Mightymover Choo-Choo 22,265 (44,676) 112 (70) 140 1,000 (746) 415 2,378 (4,756) 1967 20 N/A

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Diesel engines

Climate Model name Cost Speed Weight Power MTE Running cost/year Designed Lifespan Capacity
£ ($) km/h (mph) t hp (kW) kN £/yr ($/yr) year years
Temperate Manley-Morel DMU 12,890 (25,780) 112 (70) 32 600 (447) 95 1,278 (2,556) 1957 12 76 passengers
Temperate “Dash” 16,406 (32,812) 120 (75) 38 700 (523) 112 1,066 (2,132) 1984 15 80 passengers
Temperate SH/Hendry “25” 17,578 (35,156) 128 (80) 72 1,250 (932) 213 1,447 (2,894) 1962 18 N/A
Temperate UU “37” 19,921 (39,842) 144 (90) 101 1,750 (1,305) 299 1,828 (3,656) 1959 20 N/A
Temperate Floss “47” 21,093 (42,186) 160 (100) 112 2,580 (1,924) 332 2,132 (4,264) 1963 22 N/A
Temperate SH “125” 23,437 (46,874) 201 (125) 70 4,500 (3,356) 207 2,894 (5,788) 1978 20 8 mail
Sub-Arctic, Sub-Tropical MJS250 9,375 (18,750) 80 (50) 65 600 (447) 192 990 (1,980) 1955 22 N/A
Sub-Arctic, Sub-Tropical Kelling 3100 21,093 (42,186) 104 (65) 110 1,500 (1,119) 326 1,599 (3,198) 1958 22 N/A
Sub-Arctic, Sub-Tropical Centennial 35,156 (70,312) 112 (70) 207 6,600 (4,922) 614 2,361 (4,722) 1972 22 N/A
Sub-Arctic, Sub-Tropical CS4000 26,953 (53,906) 96 (60) 150 4,000 (2,983) 445 2,956 (5,912) 1962 20 N/A
Sub-Arctic, Sub-Tropical CS2400 18,750 (37,500) 112 (70) 120 2,400 (1,790) 356 1,599 (3,198) 1965 20 N/A
Sub-Arctic, Sub-Tropical MJS 1000 24,609 (49,218) 104 (65) 120 2,200 (1,641) 356 2,208 (4,416) 1965 22 N/A
Sub-Arctic, Sub-Tropical Turner Turbo 41,014 (82,028) 160 (100) 190 3,500 (2,610) 564 3,122 (6,244) 1977 22 N/A
Toyland Ploddyphut Diesel 18,750 (37,622) 120 (75) 95 1,400 (1,044) 282 1,904 (3,808) 1972 20 N/A
Toyland Powernaut Diesel 23,437 (47,028) 152 (95) 120 2,000 (1,491) 356 2,056 (4,112) 1978 20 N/A

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Electric engines

Climate Model name Cost Speed Weight Power MTE Running cost/year Designed Lifespan Capacity
£ ($) km/h (mph) t hp (kW) kN £/yr ($/yr) year years
Temperate SH “30” 30,468 (60,936) 160 (100) 84 3,600 (2,685) 249 2,531 (5,062) 1965 23 N/A
Temperate SH “40” 35,156 (70,312) 177 (110) 82 5,000 (3,728) 243 2,882 (5,764) 1973 25 N/A
Temperate “T.I.M.” 46,875 (93,750) 241 (150) 90 7,000 (5,220) 267 3,374 (6,748) 1984 25 N/A
Temperate “AsiaStar” 50,390 (100,780) 265 (165) 94 8,000 (5,966) 279 3,514 (7,028) 1992 25 N/A

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Monorail engines

Climate Model name Cost Speed Weight Power MTE Running cost/year Designed Lifespan Capacity
£ ($) km/h (mph) t hp (kW) kN £/yr ($/yr) year years
Temperate, Sub-Arctic, Sub-Tropical ‘X2001’ 60,937 (121,874) 305 (190) 95 9,000 (6,711) 282 3,234 (6,468) 1999 20 N/A
Temperate, Sub-Arctic, Sub-Tropical ‘Millennium Z1’ 70,312 (140,624) 336 (210) 170 10,000 (7,457) 504 3,374 (6,748) 2005 20 25 passengers
Toyland Wizzowow Z99 62,109 (124,626) 321 (200) 95 5,000 (3,728) 282 3,234 (6,468) 1999 20 N/A

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Maglev engines

Climate Model name Cost Speed Weight Power MTE Running cost/year Designed Lifespan Capacity
£ ($) km/h (mph) t hp (kW) kN £/yr ($/yr) year years
Temperate, Sub-Arctic, Sub-Tropical Lev1 ‘Leviathan’ 82,031 (164,062) 402 (251) 105 10,000 (7,457) 311 3,515 (7,030) 2020 20 N/A
Temperate, Sub-Arctic, Sub-Tropical Lev2 ‘Cyclops’ 86,718 (173,436) 450 (281) 120 12,000 (8,948) 356 3,557 (7,114) 2028 20 N/A
Temperate, Sub-Arctic, Sub-Tropical Lev3 ‘Pegasus’ 96,093 (192,186) 480 (300) 130 15,000 (11,185) 385 3,571 (7,142) 2035 20 N/A
Temperate, Sub-Arctic, Sub-Tropical Lev4 ‘Chimaera’ 111,328 (222,656) 643 (402) 300 20,000 (14,914) 890 3,584 (7,168) 2038 20 N/A
Toyland Wizzowow Rocketeer 82,031 (164,600) 482 (300) 120 10,000 (7,457) 356 3,515 (7,030) 2021 20 N/A

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Train carriages

Lastly, here are all of the train carriages available in game sorted by their model name which also happens to be their cargo type, in alphabetical order. The Toyland carriages are in a separate table, though. Also, the different types of tracks that the carriages are suited for will affect their weight and capacity. These details are shown in different columns in the same row per carriage, instead of separating carriages by the type of tracks they’re for. If my horrible explanation of this sounds confusing, have a look at the tables themselves and it will probably make sense.

General carriages

Climate Model name Cost Weight Capacity
£ ($) Empty Rail Monorail Maglev Type Rail Monorail Maglev
Temperate, Sub-Arctic, Sub-Tropical Armoured Van 1,494 (2,988) 30 32 33 33 valuables / gold / diamonds 20 bags 25 bags 27 bags
Temperate, Sub-Arctic Coal Car 1,031 (2,062) 18 48 53 55 coal 30 tonnes 35 tonnes 37 tonnes
Sub-Tropical Copper Ore Hopper 1,048 (2,096) 19 49 54 56 copper ore 30 tonnes 35 tonnes 37 tonnes
Sub-Arctic, Sub-Tropical Food Van 1,119 (2,238) 22 47 52 54 food 25 tonnes 30 tonnes 32 tonnes
Sub-Tropical Fruit Truck 1,066 (2,132) 18 43 48 50 fruit 25 tonnes 30 tonnes 32 tonnes
Temperate, Sub-Arctic, Sub-Tropical Goods Van 1,113 (2,226) 21 33 36 37 goods 25 crates 30 crates 32 crates
Temperate, Sub-Arctic, Sub-Tropical Grain Hopper 1,066 (2,132) 19 49 54 56 grain 30 tonnes 35 tonnes 37 tonnes
Temperate Iron Ore Hopper 1,048 (2,096) 19 49 54 56 iron ore 30 tonnes 35 tonnes 37 tonnes
Temperate, Sub-Arctic Livestock Van 1,125 (2,250) 20 24 25 26 livestock 25 items 30 items 32 items
Temperate, Sub-Arctic, Sub-Tropical, Toyland Mail Van 1,335 (2,670) 21 28 29 30 mail 30 bags 35 bags 37 bags
Temperate, Sub-Arctic, Sub-Tropical Oil Tanker 1,171 (2,342) 24 54 59 61 oil 30,000 35,000 37,000 litres
Sub-Arctic Paper Truck 1,148 (2,296) 18 38 43 45 paper 20 tonnes 25 tonnes 27 tonnes
Temperate, Sub-Arctic, Sub-Tropical, Toyland Passenger Carriage 1,447 (2,894) 25 27 27 27 passengers 40 45 47
Sub-Tropical Rubber Truck 1,083 (2,166) 19 40 45 47 rubber 21,000 litres 26,000 litres 28,000 litres
Temperate Steel Truck 1,148 (2,296) 18 38 43 45 steel 20 tonnes 25 tonnes 27 tonnes
Sub-Tropical Water Tanker 1,166 (2,332) 25 50 55 57 water 25,000 litres 30,000 litres 32,000 litres
Temperate, Sub-Arctic, Sub-Tropical Wood Truck 1,060 (2,120) 16 46 51 53 wood 30 tonnes 35 tonnes 37 tonnes

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Toyland only

Climate Model name Cost Weight Capacity
£ ($) Empty Rail Monorail Maglev Type Rail Monorail Maglev
Toyland Battery Truck 1,148 (2,296) 18 23 24 25 batteries 22 27 29
Toyland Bubble Van 1,113 (2,226) 21 22 22 22 bubbles 20 25 27
Toyland Candyfloss Hopper 1,042 (2,084) 20 50 55 57 candyfloss 30 tonnes 35 tonnes 37 tonnes
Toyland Cola Tanker 1,066 (2,132) 24 49 54 56 cola 25,000 litres 30,000 litres 32,000 litres
Toyland Fizzy Drink Truck 1,130 (2,260) 18 21 21 22 fizzy drinks 25 30 32
Toyland Plastic Truck 1,119 (2,238) 18 48 53 55 plastic 30,000 litres 35,000 litres 37,000 litres
Toyland Sugar Truck 1,031 (2,062) 19 49 54 56 sugar 30 tonnes 35 tonnes 37 tonnes
Toyland Sweet Van 1,060 (2,120) 21 28 30 31 sweets 25 bags 30 bags 32 bags
Toyland Toffee Hopper 1,125 (2,250) 20 50 55 57 toffee 30 tonnes 35 tonnes 37 tonnes
Toyland Toy Van 1,072 (2,144) 21 23 24 24 toys 20 25 27

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Wrapping up vehicles

So, that’s all for information on the vehicles in OpenTTD. I suppose if it’s required I can go more in depth at another time, recommending combination of vehicles and giving some tips on how to decide the best vehicles to use. However, at the moment, it seems like all of that is a bit obvious, so an in depth explanation might not be necessary. I’m not sure. Anyway, that’s all from me for now!

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